Tag Archives: Life

Don’t Worry: Everyone Goes Through the Job Search Blues

I recently received a few different messages from job seekers who were feeling beat down by the job seeking process.

One told me, “It’s 11:00 a.m. and I’m still in my pajamas.  I’m having a hard time finding any energy to send out another resume.” Another said, “I’m stuck!  I’m usually a positive, energetic person, but today, I’m just depressed.  I just can’t take another rejection!”

I know there are a lot of other job seekers out there who, from time to time, struggle to find the motivation to even get out of bed or have days where worry and anxiety seemingly overwhelms them.  Sometimes it lasts for one day, other times it can last for several days.  While it’s hard not to take your job search incredibly personal, job seekers should know that frustrations and anxiety are common; the goal is develop strategies so that you can continue a sense of constant and positive forward motion in your job search.

There’s a couple of things I would recommend you consider that can help you get out of the job seeking mud.

1.) If you are full of anxiety and becoming depressed about your job search, then take a couple days off.  Don’t jump onto any online job boards, don’t make any phone calls and don’t send out any resumes.  Instead, use this time to just clear your head and re-boot.  Everyone has individual motivation strategies that they’ve had to use in their life to overcome a problem or a challenge.  Maybe its as simple as going on a long hike or maybe its hanging out with friends or family that can give you positive reinforcement.   Start thinking about the things in your life that have helped you get out of a funk and also start thinking about the things that have worked in your job search to date to help re-focus your job seeking plan.

2.) If you are in the thick of your job search and you don’t feel like spending the whole day job seeking, then at least commit to do doing at least ONE thing that will provide continued forward motion in your search for employment.  Maybe its making one phone call, sending out one resume or simply spending an hour on a job board writing down job leads that you can come back to later.

3.) Lastly, its easy to get to a point where we can get overwhelmed with negative thoughts about our job search.  Let’s face it, for anybody, there is an unnatural amount of rejection tied to a job search.  Maybe you are not getting the responses you hoped for or maybe you’ve been to an interview but didn’t get the job offer.  Most of the time, we are never told why were rejected and are left guessing.  In these cases, we can easily overwhelm ourselves with negative assumptions we make about why we failed.  I call this ‘stinking thinking’.  Don’t let stinking thinking overtake the focus of the positive things that make you a valuable candidate; your skills, your education, your experiences, your expertise, your accomplishments, etc., etc.  You always need to remain focused on the value you can bring to a future employer.

I’ve never met a job seeker who was “unemployable”!  We all have things that are valuable to employers.  The most successful job seekers I’ve met have one common thread:  they are confident and focused on their core skills and how those skills translate to the jobs they are applying and they never waver from all the things that make them a valuable addition to an organization.

Are you a job seeker who has struggled from time to time during your search?  What are things you do to get out of the job seeking quicksand?  Email me at ahudson@ahjobslist.com and I’ll share these next week.

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For job seekers, modesty is over-rated but confidence never goes out of style.

I was in the park with my young kids the other day and heard a conversation between a child, his mother and one of his mom’s friends.

“David, how have you been?”

“I’ve been great!  I play baseball now!”

“How’s that going?”

“Terrific!  In my last game, I had three hits and a homerun!  I also pitched and got four strikeouts! My coach named me the player of the game!”

Mom chimes in:

“Now Davey! You shouldn’t brag! Remember, there were other kids on that team that helped win the game too!”

Everyone probably remembers a conversation like this from their own childhood. Ever since we were kids we’ve been reminded that it is impolite to brag, take all the credit or boast about our accomplishments.

In my job seeking consultancy the most difficult question to answer is, “So, can you tell me about yourself?”  Our awkwardness in taking ownership for our career accomplishments is also often reflected in resumes and cover letters.

So here’s the deal, job seekers:

Your ‘aw-shucks’ modesty is not endearing; it is hurting your chances of getting a job!

Employers will not correctly guess what your strengths are nor will they safely assume that your skills and accomplishments are a good fit for the job you are applying.

Your ‘aw-shucks’ modesty is not endearing; it is hurting your chances of getting a job!

The only way others will know how your hard work, education and background is tied to your success is when you TELL THEM.  The only way your future employer will know that you have the best skill sets, the most relevant experience and the differentiators that set you apart from your competition is when you make these things crystal clear in every touch point of the job application process.

So, how do you this?

The number one strategy of the successful job seekers I’ve interviewed is a focused, red-hot confidence.

Confidence is not bragging nor is it boasting.  It’s simply and directly stating and describing your very real accomplishments.

Start with your resume.  If you are using ‘wimp’ or ‘fluff’ words and phrases like “Coordinated,” “Helped,” “Highly talented,” “Motivated,” or “Hard working,” your resume will most likely not be seriously considered. If you describe yourself using results-oriented words such as “Senior level,” “Expert in….,” “Led,” “Managed,” “Created,” followed by result-oriented accomplishments, a recruiter will put your resume on the top of the pile.

In addition, if you have quantifiable results use these results to emphasize your accomplishments. For example, “increased sales by 30%,” “Improved customer satisfaction by 25%,” “Increased website traffic by 25%,” “Increased revenue by $25 million in one quarter.”

Lastly, if you are having a hard time talking about yourself in an interview or feel awkward taking credit for your success, ask yourself the following question, “What is your proudest career accomplishment?” Was it a project?  Was it something you did to earn a promotion?  Was it an accomplishment that relied on all of your skills, expertise and integrity? What was required of you to be successful? What part of your background — your education, your experience, your intuition — did you call on to be successful?  Did you have to inspire others?  Did you have convince your boss? How did you measure the results of your accomplishment?

When you start thinking about the things in your career that have made you successful, you start to understand and recognize that describing your successes is NOT bragging, it is simply taking ownership of all of the things that make you, YOU!  That is something every employer wants to understand — what makes you tick? What are the things that made you successful in the past that are going to make you successful at our organization?

Bottom line?  Confidence means not being afraid to take ownership for your successful career. It means providing a deliberate and detailed explanation of how your talents and skills, your accomplishments, your promotions, your leadership and your results are tied to the job your are applying and how those things are valuable to your future employer.

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The Rocking Chair Factor

With many of the decisions I make or the directions I take in my life, I weigh it with the perspective of what I call ‘The Rocking Chair Factor’; in other words, when I’m an old man looking back on my life, am I going to be in a rocking chair with a smile on my face reminiscing about the wonderful experiences and adventures I created for myself?  Will I feel satisfied that I lived  a life of integrity and ethics and accomplished what I set out to accomplish and lived the life I dreamed of?  Or am I going to be a bitter and cynical old man, constantly thinking “If only I had….” and wondering how time got away from me.   This kind of decision making process might not be useful to everyone, but for me, it is a constant reminder of what is really important in my life and how incredibly valuable and precious our time is on Earth.

Columnist David Brooks of the New York Times recently asked people over the age of 70 to send him ‘Life Reports’; essays about their lives and what they feel they’ve done well and areas in their lives they regret.  His column provides a fascinating snapshot of some of the common themes from those looking back on their lives.

From both the strategies of the successful as well as from those who harbor regrets in their lives, there is a ton of useful knowledge that we can all learn from and grown from in these essays.  While some of these themes might seem to some simple common sense, I would challenge everyone to ask themselves what area of their lives they can improve or change.

Read the column by clicking here

What do you think?  Are you living the life you want?  What will you be thinking when you  are in your Rocking Chair?

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